INdiana Systemic Thinking

February 9, 2008

Inside H.B. 1288: Certified Behavior Analysts

H.B. 1288 requires the state to establish the State Board of Behavior Analysts.  Behavior Analysis, as defined by the bill “means the design, implementation, and evaluation of instructional and environmental modifications to produce socially significant improvements in human behavior through skill acquisition and the reduction of problematic behavior”.  It allows for two levels of Analysts, one requires a Bachelor’s degree, while the other requires a Master’s degree, although the degree can be in any area.  Both certifications require a test and supervised hours.  The requirements mimic the requirements of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board, a non-profit Florida Corporation.

Background

This legislation was first requested at an Indiana Commission on Autism meeting.  Specifically, the commission was asked by Michelle Trivedi, “parent of an autistic child, for the commission to support legislation to be introduced in the 2008 session of the General Assembly that would require board certification for applied behavior analysts.”  The commission heard from Ms. Trivedi, but had many significant questions and did not recommend the legislation be pursued in it’s final report.  However, Rep. Vanessa Summers and Rep. Phil Hinkle, both commission members, introduced the legislation in the 2008 session.

Legislative Progress

Upon introduction, the legislation became very controversial for several reasons.  First, it did not exempt any professionals currently licensed to practice medicine, psychology, mental health counseling, social work, and marriage and family therapy.  Because the definition of what behavior analysis is, it would require all of those professions to become certified as behavior analysts to continue to practice with the licenses they already have.  Thankfully, the authors of the bill agreed to amend the bill to effectively state no-one could use the title Certified Behavior Analyst, unless they are certified.  With this amendment, the concerns of the already licensed professionals were satisfied and they did not oppose the bill in the house.  The bill passed the House last week and is now awaiting a hearing in the Senate Corrections, Criminal, and Civil Matters Committee.

February 2, 2008

IU to Study Autism Treatment: Has Openings

This is sort of a public service announcement from the Blogmeister, via the WTHR:

If you are a parent of an autistic child, the IU School of Education is encouraging you to enroll in a free research study.The “More Than Words” 14-week program is for children five and under and aims to assist in language development.To learn more about the study contact Andrea McDuffie.

Learn more about the The More Than Words program developed by the Hanen Center in Toronto, Canada.

January 30, 2008

Autism and Vaccines: Pediatricians Speak Out

Filed under: autism,Disorders,Uncategorized — kurtglmft @ 8:41 am
Tags: , , , ,

This from the Evansville Courier Press:

The nation’s largest pediatricians’ group on Monday said ABC should cancel the first episode of a new series because it perpetuates the myth that vaccines can cause autism.

ABC’s new drama, “Eli Stone,” debuts Thursday. It features British actor Jonny Lee Miller as a prophetlike lawyer who in the opening episode argues in court that a flu vaccine made a child autistic. When it is revealed in court that an executive at the fictional vaccine maker didn’t allow his own child to get the shot, jurors side with the family, giving them a huge award.

“If parents watch this program and choose to deny their children immunizations, ABC will share in the responsibility for the suffering and deaths that occur as a result. The consequences of a decline in immunization rates could be devastating to the health of our nation’s children,” Jenkins said in a statement.

Autism is a complex disorder featuring repetitive behaviors and poor social interaction and communication skills. Scientists generally believe that genetics plays a role in causing the disorder; a theory that a mercury-based preservative once widely used in childhood vaccines is to blame has been repeatedly discounted in scientific studies.

Remember folks, this is a fictional series. Sometimes the whole “bad things happen to good people” way of thinking is too much to handle. We look for reasons and people to blame because the real explanation is too difficult to accept. However, please don’t forgo vaccinating your child, as it is a proven way to make sure they will never develop a myriad of diseases, because of some theory that has little, if any basis in fact or research.

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